The product is, as the name states, the output of a reaction. For the reaction catalyzed by ADH, the product is acetaldehyde. ADH oxidizes ethanol into acetaldehyde by removing 2 H+ ions and 2 electrons.

At the top is an illustration of the ethanol reaction catalyzed by ADH where the product is acetaldehyde. ADH oxidizes ethanol into acetaldehyde by removing 2 H+ ions and 2 electrons. Beneath it is the chemical structure and formula of acetaldehyde. Hydrogen atoms are represented as white spheres, carbon atoms as black spheres, and oxygen atoms as red spheres. From the left are three white hydrogen atoms attached to a black carbon atom. From there, the carbon atom is attached to another black carbon atom that has one red oxygen atom and one white hydrogen atom attached to it

Figure 1: Top: The ethanol reaction catalyzed by ADH where the product is acetaldehyde. ADH oxidizes ethanol into acetaldehyde by removing 2 H+ ions and 2 electrons. Bottom: The chemical structure and formula of acetaldehyde. Hydrogen atoms are represented as white spheres, carbons as black spheres, and oxygen atoms as red spheres. From the left is three white hydrogen atoms attached to a black carbon atom. From there, the carbon atom is attached to another black carbon atom that has one red oxygen atom and one white hydrogen atom attached to it.

Most people think that ethanol is the only compound responsible for the feeling of being drunk; however, it has been indicated that many effects associated with alcohol consumption may be caused by increased levels of acetaldehyde, the product of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by ADH [1]. The accumulation of acetaldehyde is also the cause of the symptoms of the Alcohol FLush syndrome.

References

  1. Kima, S.W., Baea, K.Y., Shinb, H.Y., Kima, J.M., Shina, I.S., Youna, T., Kime, J., Kimc, J.K., Yoona, J.S. (2010) The Role of Acetaldehyde in Human Psychomotor Function: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study.

Co-factor

Theory overview